White-Winged Dove

Zenaida asiatica
Family: Columbidae


I’ve photographed these doves around our acre in all seasons. They seem to be the most common of the three dove species I’ve seen here, the other two being Mourning and Eurasian-collared Doves.

White-Winged Dove

Taken through my window, it is standing on a board near a feeder. You can really see the red of the eye and the baby blue ring around it, as well as some purple on its head and yellow on the neck. And, of course, the white strip on the wing. 5-15-13.

 

White-Winged Dove

Taking a dive. You can see the brown topside of the tail. 5-15-13.

White-Winged Dove

Taking off from a wire 5-22-12

White-Winged Dove

Landing on a wire 8-10-12

White-Winged Dove

A couple (I presume) in a large Oak Tree near the house 2-21-13

White-Winged Dove

Sitting all ‘dove-like’ on a feeder on our porch railing 3-18-13

white-winged-dove-4-16-13-2

Perched and Puffy…on a chain link fence near the house 4-16-13

White-Winged Dove

Several from a larger flock perched up on the high wires just beyond our fence line 9-20-12

White-Winged Dove

Perched on the wheelbarrow out by the brick shed taking turns getting to the pot of rainwater sitting on the ground 9-7-13


Range

Southwestern United States, Mexico, Central America and the Caribbean, but has recently expanded throughout all of Texas, into Oklahoma, Louisiana and coastal Mississippi, and has been introduced into Florida.

Habitat

Scrub, woodlands, desert, urban and cultivated areas. It builds a flimsy stick nest in any type of tree, where it will lay two eggs.

Food

A variety of seeds, grains and fruits. Those in the Sonoran Desert feed on pollen and nectar, then the fruits and seeds of the saguaro cactus. They also  eat from bird feeders (mostly what falls to the ground since they are largely ground foragers), favoring cracked corn.

Other

  • They are so dependent on the saguaro cactus for food, they time their migration and nesting to match its fruiting schedule.
  • They use a secretion from the esophagus, called crop milk, to feed nestlings. Both parents may consume snails and bone fragments to help their bodies create this fluid.
  • The 1980s song by Stevie Nicks “Edge of Seventeen” prominently mentions the White-winged Dove.
  • The oldest White-winged Dove on record was at least 21 years and 9 months old. It was banded in Arizona and later recovered in Mexico.

Information Resources


 

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