Northern Mockingbird 2

COMMON NAME:  Northern Mockingbird
SCIENTIFIC NAME:  Mimus polyglottos
FAMILY:  Mimidae
ORDER:  Passeriformes


A Northern Mockingbird perched high in an Oak tree on this acre in Texas in early spring, singing out its song.

Perched high in an Oak tree. 15 Mar 2013. Click to enlarge.

Perched on one of the tallest trees on the property in early spring, singing out its tune.


Two Northern Mockingbirds playing a game of early spring chase.

A game of chase. 19 Feb 2013. Click to enlarge.

It is in early spring that I most often see the Mockingbirds engaging in chasing one another. I’m not sure if it’s two males battling over territory or a male chasing a female for mating season.


A Northern Mockingbird flying into a large oak tree for cover while being chased by another Mockingbird.

Flying into a large Oak tree. 15 Mar 2013. Click to enlarge.

This Northern Mockingbird is flying into a large oak tree for cover while being chased by another Mockingbird.


A Northern Mockingbird flying through the air from one side of the property to the at the end of the chase/battle.

In flight. 15 Mar 2013. Click to enlarge.

The mockingbird flying from the “battlezone” to the other side of the property after the chase/air play has ceased.

A mockingbird resting on a beam which is part of an electric pole structure.

Resting on a beam. 15 Mar 2013. Click to enlarge.

It went and perched high up on the electric pole beam to enjoy a bit of peace.


A Mockingbird sitting on a chain link fence outside my window in mid summer.

Mocking me. 31 Jul 2013. Click to enlarge.

The Mockingbird just stood there…mocking me. Standing on a chain link fence about 15-20 feet from my window, taken through the glass. It looks like it may be at the beginning stage of its molting process.


A Northern Mockingbird perched on a chain link fence in its later stage of molting.

Later molting stage. 15 Sep 2013. Click to enlarge.

From what I have seen so far regarding the molting process, I think this bird may be in its later stage of molting, especially since the previous picture shows what looks like was the beginning of it. Many birds begin molting early to late summer, a process which lasts about 6 weeks or so.


A Northern Mockingbird in flight in mid spring on this acre in Texas.

Flight. 28 Apr 2013. Click to enlarge.

An additional flight photo showing the underside of the wings.


A Northern Mockingbird perched high in an Elm tree, rear view.

The end. 18 Aug 2013. Click to enlarge.

Later in the summer, perched on a high branch in a very large Elm tree on the property. If you click to enlarge, this photo affords a pretty clear view of the eye, its color and other detail.


A Few Details About This Species:

Range The Mockingbird lives year-round in most of the southern U.S. and Mexico, as well as eastern portions of a few Northeastern states and southern bits of some mid-western states. During breeding it may reside in locations not far north of its year-round range.

Habitat It usually resides in fields and forest edges, usually seen in farmlands, roadsides, city parks, suburban areas and grassy areas with thickets and brushy deserts. It does not nest in densely forested areas.

Diet This bird is an omnivore, its diet consisting of anthropods, earthworms, berries, fruits, seeds, and once in awhile, lizards. They may drink from puddles, river and lake edges, or dew or rain droplets which gather on plants. They may even drink sap from recently pruned trees. It’s mostly carnivorous during breeding, switching to mainly fruits during fall and winter. They often forage on the ground, preferring areas with short grass, and can be commonly found on mowed lawns.

Other – The Northern Mockingbird is the state bird of Texas and 4 other states. It is known for its intelligence, having been shown in a 2009 study to be able to recognize individual humans, particularly those who had previously been intruders or threats. The Mockingbird’s name “Mimus polyglottos” means “many-tongued mimic” because of its outstanding ability to mimic various sounds.


More Northern Mockingbird Photos and Information At:

iNaturalist
Project Noah
All About Birds (Cornell Lab of Ornithology)
Wikipedia
Google Images


Related Links on this site:

– All Bird Posts
– Bird Index


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