Bewick’s Wren

COMMON NAME — Bewick’s Wren
SCIENTIFIC NAME — Thryomanes bewickii
FAMILY — Troglodytidae
ORDER — Passeriformes


Bewick's Wren perched high in a Post Oak tree.  20 Jan 2013. Click to enlarge.

Bewick’s Wren perched high in a Post Oak tree. 20 Jan 2013. Click to enlarge.

A very small bird, only about 5-1/2 inches long. They look similar to the Carolina Wren which are also around sometimes, but the two are different enough that they are easily distinguished from each other. The Bewick’s are year-round residents.


Bewick's Wren on an egg carton feeder on the porch. 22 Jan 2013. Click to enlarge.

Bewick’s Wren on an egg carton feeder on the porch. 22 Jan 2013. Click to enlarge.

In winter, I put out feeders primarily with black oil sunflower seeds. Bewick’s Wrens sometimes eat from the feeders, but mostly they refer to go after the seeds which fall on the porch floor or to the ground.


Bewick's Wren, crown view, eating sunflower seeds from an  egg carton feeder. 22 Jan 2013.

Bewick’s Wren, crown view, eating sunflower seeds from an egg carton feeder. 22 Jan 2013.

This species has a brown crown and long white eyebrows.


Bewick's Wren high in a tree singing a song. 12 Mar 2012. Click to enlarge.

Bewick’s Wren high in a tree singing a song. 12 Mar 2012. Click to enlarge.

For a small bird, it puts out a loud song, but fortunately a very pretty song.


Bewick's Wren perched in a Pecan tree next to the porch. 16 Apr 2013. Click to enlarge.

Bewick’s Wren perched in a Pecan tree next to the porch. 16 Apr 2013. Click to enlarge.

This wren made a nest in the Topsy Turvey tomato planter hanging from the porch just next to the Pecan tree. When tending to its nest and young, it would first stop and perch on the Pecan tree, seeming to check whether all was safe and clear, before hopping over to the planter.


Bewick's Wren perched in a Pecan tree next to the porch. 6 Apr 2013. Click to enlarge.

Bewick’s Wren perched in a Pecan tree next to the porch. 6 Apr 2013. Click to enlarge.

Rear view!


Bewick's Wren perched on a barbed wire fence. 20 Jun 2013. Click to enlarge.

Bewick’s Wren perched on a barbed wire fence. 20 Jun 2013. Click to enlarge.

From one of my favorite photo sessions. This was taken with a better lens I had at the time. The wren was sitting on a barbed wire fence bordering the neighbor’s pasture land. I especially like the green background. Notice how the tail sticks straight up. The beak is long and slightly curved.


Bewick's Wren on the porch railing near the feeder. 24 Dec 2012. Click to enlarge.

Bewick’s Wren on the porch railing near the feeder. 24 Dec 2012. Click to enlarge.

All puffed up on a freezing cold winter morning. On days like this the birds relied on the feeders a good bit. When a warm day would come, they seemed to prefer to be off on their own.


Identification Sources:

Book – Birds of Texas by Stan Tekiela
Website – allaboutbirds.org


A few details from Wikipedia’s Bewick’s Wren page:

Range – Native to North America. Its range is from southern British Columbia, southern Ontario, and southwestern Pennsylvania, Maryland, south to Mexico, Arkansas and the northern Gulf states. The Bewick’s wren does not migrate.

Habitat – It lives in thickets, brush piles and hedgerows, open woodlands and scrubby areas, often near streams.

Diet – The Bewick’s Wren usually eats insects and spiders off plants and the ground. They sometimes forage with chickadees and other birds.


 Related Links on this site:

All Bird posts
Birds Index page


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