Familiar Bluet

COMMON NAME: Familiar Bluet
SCIENTIFIC NAME: Enallagma civile
FAMILY: Coenagrionidae (Narrow-winged damselflies)
ORDER: Odonata (Carnivorous insects)

 

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Familiar Bluet perched on a grass stalk. 30 Sep 2013. Full size photo, does not enlarge.

This male damsel is so small and thin that my camera’s auto-focus will not detect it.

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Familiar Bluet perched on a grass stalk. 30 Sep 2013. Click to enlarge.

Although this species is common and widespread, I don’t notice them all that often around here. I’m most likely to see on in warm, sunny day within a few days after a good rain.
I have yet to see and photograph a female, which is similar to the male but either a paler blue or olive or tan.

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Familiar Bluet perched on a grass stalk. 30 Sep 2013. Click to enlarge.

Here it is in flight. You can barely see the fluttering wings, instead there is just a slight blur effect around the head and upper body.

Familiar Bluet perched on a grass stalk. 5 May 2012. Click to enlarge.

Familiar Bluet perched on a grass stalk. 5 May 2012. Click to enlarge.

This photo was taken the previous year. A bit blurry, but I like that it was looking at me as I photographed it. Also, it looks like it may be holding on to a black bug on the underside of the blade of grass.


Identification Sources:

Wikipedia – Familiar Bluet photos and info
iNaturalist.org – Familiar Bluet page
GregLasley.com – Familiar Bluet page (excellent professional photos)


A few details from OdonotaCentral‘s and  Insectidentification.org‘s Familiar Bluet pages:

Range: Throughout the U.S. and southern Canada except for Pacific Northwest south through Mexico to Colombia and Venezuela.

Habitat: They spend part of their life under water, and lay their eggs there, so it is essential they remain close to a water source, any of which will do. Adults are active from late spring to autumn.

Diet: Adults eat small insects found on plants, which is why they can be seen quickly darting from plant to plant.


Related Links on this site:

All Dragonfly/Damsel Posts
Dragonflies Damselflies Index Page


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